The Flour Handprint https://www.theflourhandprint.com A Food Nerd's Guide to Homemade Cooking Tue, 07 Apr 2020 18:27:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://www.theflourhandprint.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/cropped-Apron-32x32.png The Flour Handprint https://www.theflourhandprint.com 32 32 Flourless Peanut Butter Cookies https://www.theflourhandprint.com/flourless-peanut-butter-cookies/ https://www.theflourhandprint.com/flourless-peanut-butter-cookies/#respond Tue, 07 Apr 2020 18:27:17 +0000 https://www.theflourhandprint.com/?p=9532 This page contains affiliate links. For more information please read my Disclosure Policy. These easy, one bowl flourless peanut butter cookies are a dairy-free, gluten free cookie that is quick and delicious. With only 6 ingredients and 20 minutes you can have a batch of soft peanut butter cookies that everyone can enjoy! Truth time. […]

The post Flourless Peanut Butter Cookies appeared first on The Flour Handprint.

]]>

This page contains affiliate links. For more information please read my Disclosure Policy.

These easy, one bowl flourless peanut butter cookies are a dairy-free, gluten free cookie that is quick and delicious. With only 6 ingredients and 20 minutes you can have a batch of soft peanut butter cookies that everyone can enjoy!

a stack of flourless peanut butter cookies in front of a glass of milk

Truth time. This recipe has been in my back pocket for a while. They’re delicious, and easily my all time favorite peanut butter cookies (one bowl and 20 minutes, um yea!), but I just never got around to it! With the state of the world currently (writing this during the COVID-19 outbreak), I figured, hey, a 6 ingredient, flourless, dairy free peanut butter cookie might be super welcome right now.

If you are gluten free or dairy free, this will work for you! I’ve given it out to friends when they’re in need of an allergen friendly cookie, and it’s been well received, but here’s the truth of it…

Even if you love gluten and dairy, you’ll LOVE this cookie. It’s soft, so quick and easy, and dare I say it, the last peanut butter cookie recipe you’ll ever need.

Natural, Homemade, Or Big Brand Peanut Butter

As a quick note, since I highly recommend homemade peanut butter, there are some tips to baking successfully with different types of peanut butter.

  • Big Brand – I’ve made this recipe with standard JIF and Skippy peanut butters. The texture is completely fine! As some big brands manufacture sweetened peanut butters, this may result in a sweeter cookie…which isn’t really a problem!
  • Natural – If I buy peanut butter at the store this is what I go with. No added sugar or preservatives, but a good amount of oil separated at the top. This recipe will work with natural peanut butter, but please, please be sure to mix well! You want the oil reincorporated as much as possible before measuring for this cookie.
  • Homemade – If you follow my how to make nut butters guide (linked above), your homemade peanut butter will work. If you add oil to your homemade nut butter you need to make sure your peanut butter is thoroughly mixed, if it’s too oily or thin, you’ll have messy, runny cookies.

6 Ingredient Peanut Butter Cookies

There are plenty of 3 ingredient cookies out there, so why use 6? Because they’re better. While you can bake an adequate cookie with less, I find that this combo of 6 ingredients is the magic blend that makes not just a good, but a fabulous, delicious, peanut butter cookie that will knock your socks off.

a cup of peanut butter, a quarter cup of brown sugar, a half cup of white sugar, a bottle of vanilla, one egg, and salt
  • Peanut Butter – Your peanut butter of choice!
  • White Sugar – Just granulated sugar works best, you’ll need maybe a tablespoon extra for sprinkling on top pre-bake
  • Brown Sugar – A packed quarter cup
  • Vanilla – make your own vanilla here!
  • Egg – 1 large egg, or the equivalent liquid egg works just as well!
  • Baking Soda – Just enough to gift it a teeny rise.

A Note on Salt – I generally add a pinch of salt to my cookies because I like a speck of saltiness in my sweets. Peanut butter often already contains salt and it is by no means a necessary addition to this recipe. However, if you make your own peanut butter without salt, or have one that contains none, or you just like the idea please add a pinch!

How to Make One Bowl Peanut Butter Cookies

One bowl, a hand mixer or stand mixer, and maybe ten minutes max, you’re cookies are in the oven no problem. Quick, easy, cookie heaven.

the process of making peanut butter cookies, first the bowl with peanut butter and sugars mixed, then the dough, then the dough on a cookie sheet formed into cookies
  1. Preheat your oven to 350°F. In a large mixing bowl or the bowl of your stand mixer, measure out your peanut butter, and both sugars. (If you have a kitchen scale, you don’t even need to get measuring cups dirty!)
  2. Beat the peanut butter and sugars together until thoroughly combined, maybe a minute or two.
  3. Add in the egg and beat to combine.
  4. Add in baking soda and vanilla (and salt if using) and mix thoroughly. No flour here means no need to worry about overmixing, just mix until the dough can be pressed together and hold it’s shape.
  5. Take small balls of dough in your hand and roll between your palms until smooth. Place on a baking sheet leaving an two inches between each cookie.
  6. Place a tablespoon of white sugar into a bowl. Dip a fork into the sugar then press it down on each cookie, creating a cross hatch pattern on the top. Sprinkle with extra sugar because it’s delicious.
  7. Bake for 8 to 10 minutes or until set (no longer look wet on top). Remove and let cool on baking sheet for 5 minutes, then remove to a cooling rack.
  8. Store for up to 4 days in an airtight container!

Pro Tip: Pressing the fork down onto the cookies will create a rustic, fragmented edge around them. If this bothers you (you want a perfectly round cookie), press the cookies flat with your palm and then press lightly with the fork to create the cross hatch.

a cooling rack of peanut butter cookies

FAQ’s

Can these cookies be frozen?

Yes! I recommend forming them to the point of pressing down with the fork so they’re flat, then freezing them on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Once frozen, place in a bag or freezer safe container. Bake at 350°F for 12 to 15 minutes.

Can I use different nut butters?

Almond butter works great!

Why do I need to create a cross hatch on top of the cookie?

Peanut butter cookies are denser than let’s say a chocolate chip. Simply leaving them in ball form won’t allow them to bake properly. While the cross hatch is traditional and creates a pretty rustic cookie, you can achieve the same goal by simply pressing them flat.

Can I double this recipe?

Of course, I almost always do!

Can I use an egg replacement?

While I’ve tested it with liquid eggs (still a real egg product) and it works, I’ve not been successful using flax egg. Feel free to experiment and let me know the results.

a stack of flourless peanut butter cookies in front of a cooling rack of cookies

Eat & Enjoy!

These flourless peanut butter cookies are going to be your new go to, I can feel it! It makes about 18 and they get polished off in days in our 3 person household. I hope they satisfy and until next time, happy eating!

If you liked this cookie recipe, you may also enjoy…

a stack of flourless peanut butter cookies
Print

Flourless Peanut Butter Cookies

An easy, one bowl flourless peanut butter cookie that bakes up soft and tender with big peanut butter flavor. Quick and delicious every time!
Course Dessert
Cuisine American
Keyword cookies, flourless, peanut butter
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Total Time 20 minutes
Servings 18 Cookies
Calories 118kcal
Author Mikayla M

Ingredients

  • 9 ounces smooth peanut butter* 1 cup
  • 3 1/2 ounces white sugar 1/2 cup, plus 1 tbs for sprinkling
  • 1 1/2 ounces brown sugar 1/4 cup, packed
  • 1 large egg
  • 3/4 tsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • pinch salt optional, see note*

Instructions

  • Preheat your oven to 350°F and get a large baking sheet out.
  • In a large bowl or the bowl of your stand mixer add peanut butter and both sugars and beat until thoroughly combined.
  • Add in egg and mix until thoroughly combined.
  • Add in baking soda, vanilla, and salt if using, mix until combined and dough comes together. You should be able to press dough together and it hold.
  • Form one inch balls by rolling dough between your palms. Place on baking sheet, two inches apart.
  • Place the extra tablespoon of white sugar in a small bowl and dip a fork into it. Press down on the cookies to create a cross hatch pattern. Sprinkle with extra sugar if desired.
  • Bake for 8 to 10 minutes then remove from oven and let sit on baking sheet for 5 minutes.
  • Transfer to a cooling rack. Once cool, store in an airtight container for up to 4 days.

Notes

*Big brand, natural, or homemade peanut butters all work. Please be sure to thoroughly mix natural or homemade peanut butters before measuring to reincorporate any separated oil.
*Most peanut butters contain salt. If you have a homemade, salt free peanut butter or want a bit more salt, add a pinch of salt to the dough with the vanilla.

Nutrition

Serving: 1cookie | Calories: 118kcal | Carbohydrates: 11g | Protein: 4g | Fat: 7g | Saturated Fat: 2g | Cholesterol: 10mg | Sodium: 115mg | Potassium: 99mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 9g | Vitamin A: 15IU | Calcium: 10mg | Iron: 1mg

The post Flourless Peanut Butter Cookies appeared first on The Flour Handprint.

]]>
https://www.theflourhandprint.com/flourless-peanut-butter-cookies/feed/ 0
Crock pot Pineapple Pork Loin https://www.theflourhandprint.com/crock-pot-pineapple-pork-loin/ https://www.theflourhandprint.com/crock-pot-pineapple-pork-loin/#respond Sat, 04 Apr 2020 07:19:01 +0000 https://www.theflourhandprint.com/?p=9474 This page contains affiliate links. For more information please read my Disclosure Policy. Make this Crock pot Pineapple Pork Loin using basic pantry staples and transform a simple pork loin into a shredded, saucy plate of pineapple pulled pork. With your slow cooker doing the hard work, this is an easy weeknight favorite with leftovers […]

The post Crock pot Pineapple Pork Loin appeared first on The Flour Handprint.

]]>

This page contains affiliate links. For more information please read my Disclosure Policy.

Make this Crock pot Pineapple Pork Loin using basic pantry staples and transform a simple pork loin into a shredded, saucy plate of pineapple pulled pork. With your slow cooker doing the hard work, this is an easy weeknight favorite with leftovers to spare.

a black platter with white rice, pineapple, and a cooked glazed pork loin

Pork loin is a staple standby in our house. Often sold as large roasts, it’s an easy way to feed a group or to cook once and have leftovers to re-imagine for days. This crock pot pineapple pork loin ticks all of those boxes and is packed with big flavor. 

With very simple ingredients I can rub the loin down with a homemade spice mix, give it a quick sear, then toss it in my slow cooker for a few hours while I go about my day. A pot of rice later, some Hawaiian rolls, and a few minutes to whip up a sauce from the slow cooker juices, and dinner is on the table. Everyone is happy, myself included!

Pork Loin vs. Pork Tenderloin

If there’s one thing to remember it’s to make sure you’re picking up the right cut. Pork loin is not to be confused with pork tenderloin! 

  • Pork Loin – A lean, large, wide cut of meat that is broken down into many different cuts, like chops and roasts. You want a boneless pork loin roast for this recipe. It may be sold as a top loin or center loin roast and it benefits from low, long cooks.
  • Pork Tenderloin – Similarly named but NOT a similar cut in any other way. Tenderloin is a thin, narrow cut that averages about 1 pound and is considered one of the most tender cuts of pork available. It’s best cooked quickly at high heat, and cannot be substituted in this recipe. 

PRO TIP: Choose a pork loin with a nice white fat cap on it. A lean cut like pork loin benefits from the extra fat to stay moist and tender.

Pineapple Pork Loin Ingredients

I love this kind of recipe, the one that takes just a few very simple, even standard ingredients, and transforms them into magic.

a pork loin on a piece of parchment paper with a bowl of pineapple chunks, an onion, soy sauce, and a spice mix
  • 3-4 pound pork loin – remember to look for that fat cap!
  • Soy sauce – Your preferred brand
  • A can of pineapple chunks – make sure they’re in 100% juice
  • A sweet onion – Maui or Vidalia onions are my go to, but any sweet onion will do!
  • Ginger
  • Paprika
  • Onion powder
  • Salt
  • A dash of oil
  • Cornstarch – This is for a slurry, so you’ll need a splash of water too

PRO TIP: Can’t find sweet onions? In a pinch, substitute red onion with ½ a tablespoon of honey. 

How to Make Pineapple Pulled Pork in the Slow Cooker

While it’s not quite ‘dump and go’, this easy slow cooker pineapple pork loin is a family favorite. Taking 5 minutes to make sauce at the really makes all the difference, so I recommend not skipping it!

the steps for making crockpot pineapple pork loin, first the pork loin rubbed, then it topped with onions pineapple and sauce, then it cooked
  1. Heat a tablespoon of oil in a large skillet over medium high heat. While your pan is heating, combine your onion powder, paprika, salt, and pepper in a small bowl. 
  2. Pat your pork loin dry and rub down with the spice mixture. When your pan is hot, sear the loin on all sides, beginning with the fat side down, until the outside is caramelized and browned, about 3 to 4 minutes per side.
  3. While the pork is searing, dice your onion. Open your pineapple and pour off the juice into a separate bowl with the soy sauce. 
  4. Place half the chunks of pineapple in the bottom of your slow cooker then place the seared pork loin on top, fat side up. Add in the remaining pineapple, the diced onion, and pour over the pineapple juice and soy sauce mixture. Cover and cook on low for 5 hours. 
  5. When your pork is done, remove from the slow cooker and set aside. Ladle the liquid through a sieve into a saucepan set over medium high heat and bring it to a simmer. Reserve some of the pineapple chunks for serving.
  6. Whisk the cornstarch with 1 ½ tablespoons of cold water to make a slurry. When sauce is simmering, slowly whisk the slurry in and continue stirring gently until thickened. 
  7. Shred the pork and serve with the reserved pineapple chunks and a generous drizzle of sauce. 

Simple, right? It shreds like a dream and with that sauce…mmmmmmm, yes! Keep a couple cans of pineapple chunks in the cupboard and you can whip it up anytime!

Pro Tip: Use a food processor to chop the onion uniformly and quickly!

crockpot pineapple pork loin shredded on a platter with rice and sauce

FAQ’S

Can I skip searing the pork loin?

Technically yes. Your pork loin will cook fine without searing it first. However searing the spice rubbed pork first wakes up the aromatic nature of the spices (big flavor), and creates a crust. That crust creates a beautiful texture when you shred the pork, a lovely combination of crunchy browned edges and tender shredded meat.

Do I need to strain the sauce?

No, it’s certainly not necessary if you’re comfortable with your sauce having chunks of onions in it. However, straining it leaves you with a silky drizzly sauce I highly recommend.

Can I use another cut of pork?

Absolutely! This recipe will work with either pork butt (pork shoulder) or boneless pork country ribs.

Can I make this in the oven instead?

Yes! Simply start your recipe by searing the pork in a large dutch oven or oven safe pot. Then add in the pineapple, onion, and the pineapple juice/soy sauce mixture. Cover and place in a 325°F oven for 2 to 3 hours, or until you can shred it easily with a fork

Can this be frozen?

Absolutely. Prepare the pork loin as directed, then shred and freeze in desired portions. I recommend making the sauce and freezing it in an ice cube tray, then adding cubes to the bags or containers of shredded pork.

a plate of pineapple pulled pork with rice

Eat & Enjoy!

This is one of those simple recipes that I think your whole family will enjoy, even the littlest ones (my little one does!). Best of all, this makes leftovers for days! Pork tacos, pork sliders (with those hawaiian rolls, yum!), or just a plate of rice and pork with sauce can feed us happily all week. What’s not to love? I hope you enjoy, and until next time, Happy Eating!

If you liked this recipe, you may also enjoy…

a black platter with rice and pineapple chunks around a roasted pork loin
Print

Crock Pot Pineapple Pork Loin

Sweet and savory pineapple pork loin cooks easily in your slow cooker. Shred and finish with a silky sauce for an easy weeknight meal.
Course dinner
Cuisine American
Keyword dinner, pork, slow cooker
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 5 hours
Making the Sauce 5 minutes
Total Time 5 hours 20 minutes
Servings 8
Calories 339kcal
Author Mikayla M

Ingredients

  • 3 1/2 lb pork loin
  • 1 tbs oil
  • 1 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp paprika
  • 1 tsp onion powder
  • 1 tsp ginger, ground
  • 20 ounces pineapple chunks in 100% juice*
  • 1/2 cup soy sauce
  • 2/3 cup sweet onion, diced about 1/2 an onion
  • 1 tbs cornstarch
  • 1 1/2 tbs cold water

Instructions

  • Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium high heat. Combine the salt, paprika, onion powder, and ginger in a bowl.
  • Pat your pork loin dry with paper towels then rub in the spice mixture.
  • Sear the pork in the hot pan until browned on each side, beginning with the fat side down. 3 to 4 minutes on each side.
  • Meanwhile, dice your onion. Then combine the soy sauce with the juice from the can of pineapple chunks, you should get about ¾ cups of juice from the can.
  • Place half the pineapple chunks on the bottom of your slow cooker then place your seared pork loin on top of them with the fat side up.
  • Add in the remaining pineapple, diced onion, and pour the soy sauce/pineapple juice mixture over the top.
  • Cover and cook on low for 5 hours. The pork should shred easily with a fork.
  • Strain the liquid from the slow cooker through a sieve into a medium saucepan over medium high heat and bring to a simmer. Reserve some pineapple chunks from the slow cooker for serving.
  • Whisk the cornstarch with 1 ½ tbs cold water to make a slurry then slowly whisk it into the simmering sauce. Continue to stir gently until thickened.
  • Serve the pork with the sauce and reserved pineapple chunks.

Notes

*Do NOT discard the pineapple juice, it’s essential to the recipe!

Nutrition

Calories: 339kcal | Carbohydrates: 14g | Protein: 47g | Fat: 10g | Saturated Fat: 3g | Cholesterol: 125mg | Sodium: 1346mg | Potassium: 882mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 11g | Vitamin A: 159IU | Vitamin C: 7mg | Calcium: 27mg | Iron: 2mg
a pork loin being shredded over an image of the whole pork loin

The post Crock pot Pineapple Pork Loin appeared first on The Flour Handprint.

]]>
https://www.theflourhandprint.com/crock-pot-pineapple-pork-loin/feed/ 0
Loquat Jam https://www.theflourhandprint.com/small-batch-loquat-jam/ https://www.theflourhandprint.com/small-batch-loquat-jam/#comments Thu, 02 Apr 2020 00:36:02 +0000 http://www.theflourhandprint.com/?p=7598 This page contains affiliate links. For more information please read my Disclosure Policy. This easy, ginger and vanilla infused loquat jam recipe comes together in about 30 minutes on the stove. Learn how to make loquat jam with water bath canning instructions included for year long enjoyment. It’s a fabulous way to preserve either a […]

The post Loquat Jam appeared first on The Flour Handprint.

]]>

This page contains affiliate links. For more information please read my Disclosure Policy.

This easy, ginger and vanilla infused loquat jam recipe comes together in about 30 minutes on the stove. Learn how to make loquat jam with water bath canning instructions included for year long enjoyment. It’s a fabulous way to preserve either a small batch of loquats, or use the excess from your tree!

loquat jam in a small jar

There’s something special about homemade jam. I’ve shared homemade strawberry Jam, pomegranate jelly, pear butter, pomegranate cranberry jam, and all are truly delicious. BUT, this one is unique guys, and oh so delicious.

Living in California, I have access to a LOT of produce, but until last year, I’d never heard of a loquat before. It was only at this ONE u-pick orchard that I could even get them. If you have a tree and it’s excess fruit is bringing you here…I’m jealous.

Now that I know about the loquat, I battle the horde of other ‘in the know’ people at the u-pick for my bag of them and immediately head home to make this loquat jam. It’s a small batch since that’s all I ever have enough for, but it can be easily doubled or tripled for those with more fruit to work with.

What’s a Loquat?

One major benefit of living surrounded by amazing California produce and it’s growers means I can talk directly to the people producing it!

bowl of loquats

He told me I could liken it to a tart, slightly more tropical apricot. They’re delicate and don’t travel well, which is why they’re not a grocery store fruit. But that shouldn’t stop us from eating them!

Turns out they’re actually known as a Japanese plum, and are a fruit native to China. There are tons of varieties, almost 800 but only a few are grown in California. The flesh is bright yellow and both the large seeds and skin come off remarkably easily.

Loquat Jam Ingredients

Aside from the gorgeous fruit, there are a few other simple ingredients you need to make this loquat jam recipe.

loquats, sugar, vanilla bean, and ground ginger
  • Loquats – even for a small batch like this, you’ll need about 2lbs of fruit. After seeds and skins are removed, it’s less than you think!
  • Vanilla Bean – I love fresh vanilla in jam, and seeds are lovely to look at suspended in jam, but you can also use 3 teaspoons of vanilla extract instead.
  • Ginger – I prefer ground because it adds flavor but not texture. To use fresh ginger, substitute 1 tablespoon of grated ginger.
  • Sugar – Just white, granulated sugar.

How to make Loquat Jam

The more I make homemade fruit and veggie preserves the more I realize just how simple it is! I’ve included both instructions for making the jam, and instructions for water bath canning your loquat ginger jam for safe shelf storage. If you’re canning and not experienced, please read the canning instructions BEFORE you start cooking. It takes some timing.

inside of a loquat
  1. First, process the 2 lbs of loquats. Simply cut them in half, remove the seeds and peel off the skin. There is a small layer of thin white pith beneath the seeds, peel that off as well.
  2. When all your fruit is cleaned, chop it into small chunks. It will break down further with cooking.
  3. If using fresh vanilla bean, split the pod and scrape out the seeds. Reserve the pod.
  4. Combine the fruit, sugar, ginger, and vanilla (pod included) into a large saucepan over medium heat.
  5. Stir until the sugar dissolves, then continue to stir every few minutes, dragging a spoon over the bottom of the pan to prevent sticking and scorching.
  6. Continue to cook until the loquats have broken down into small pieces (like the size of peppercorns), and the mixture has thickened to a dense syrup. When you can drag your spoon along the bottom at the jam very slowly fills it back in and clings to the spoon, you’re done. This took 25 minutes for me. Remove the vanilla bean pod.
  7. Proceed with canning, or pour in clean jars and store in the fridge for up to 1 month once cooled.

The longer you cook it, the thicker it will be. While this is not harmful or inedible in any way, to achieve the spreadable jam consistency, do not cook too long. It will thicken as it cools, so stop while the mixture still moves with some fluidity.

Pro Tip: If your fruit is still in large chunks when the jam begins to thicken use the back of a wooden spoon, or a potato masher to break it down quickly.

loquat jam

Water Bath Canning (optional)

Because this is a small batch recipe, whether you choose to process it for long term storage is completely up to you. 2 pounds of loquats cooks down into a surprisingly small amount, only about 12 ounces of jam. I chose to can mine in small 4 ounce jars so I can enjoy it all year.

You’ll need:

  • A large canning pot with canning rack
  • Jar clamps – This is essential, trust me!
  • Hand Protection – I like to use thick gloves, but my mom goes with towels, just be aware those jars will be HOT.
  • Funnel – A good wide mouth one works well for canning.
  • Ladle – I like a nice metal one for working with hot jam.
  • Four 4 ounce mason jars (or whatever jars you choose to use) – I like 4 ounce jars because I go through it faster, which means more jam variety in my fridge, but you can use any jar with NEW lids.
  • You can also buy a canning set, but there are tools in there I never use, so that’s up to you!

To water bath can your jam:

  1. Before you start cooking your jam fill your canning pot with enough water to cover your canning jars by 1 inch. Bring it to a boil over high heat. 
  2. While your jam is cooking place your clean jars in the pot of boiling water for a minute or so to warm them up. This prevents cracking from a temperature difference when you add the hot jam to them. 
  3. Remove them from the water with your jar clamps and place them on a towel upside down to let the water run out. 
  4. When your jam is done, flip the jars over using your hand protection, they’ll still be hot.
  5. Using your funnel and ladle, fill jars immediately with your hot jam, leaving ¼” of space between the rim and the jam. 
  6. Wipe the rims clean carefully with a warm, damp paper towel then dry them completely. This is important for the jam to seal properly.
  7. Place seals on and using your hand protection, screw on the lids as tightly as you can. Then use your jar clamps to submerge the jars in the boiling water again. 
  8. Allow to ‘process’ in the boiling water for 10 minutes. Remove and set them on a towel, (they’ll be very hot!) and leave them at room temperature until each lid has ‘popped’ 

Pro Tip: You’ll know the jars are ready for the cupboard when you hear a ‘pop’ of the seal locking. You can also check this by pushing down on the center of the seal. If it clicks, it isn’t done yet. This can take up to 24 hours, so be patient!

FAQ’s

Can I substitute vanilla extract for fresh vanilla?

Absolutely, sub in 3 teaspoons for 1 fresh vanilla bean.

Can I use fresh ginger instead of ground?

Yes. One tablespoon of finely minced or shredded ginger is equivalent of about 1/4 teaspoon ground.

Can I freeze this instead of canning it?

Yes! To freeze your jam, place the cooked loquat jam in clean, freezer safe containers, leaving about 1 inch of space between the jam level and the top of the container. Let cool completely at room temperature. Then cover and freeze for up to 1 year.

This is a small batch, can I double or triple it?

Absolutely! If loquats weren’t so hard to get around here, I’d definitely make a large batch! You can double or even triple this with no problem, just increase the other ingredients accordingly.

How long is it good for?

Freshly cooked jam can be stored in a fridge for up to 1 month. If you choose to freeze or can your jam, it’s stable for up to a year. Once opened however, you should consume if within a month.

Don’t I need pectin?

Nope! This loquat jam recipe requires no pectin. They’re naturally high in pectin which means they’ll set into a lovely jam with just some sugar and a bit of time.

Enjoy your Loquat Jam!

I’m a big fan of tart and sweet jams. It’s refreshing to have a break from the heavily sweet store bought jams, or those made with really sweet fruit.

I love this particular jam on toast, waffles, and other warm baked goods. It’s also perfect for filling sandwich cookies like my Shortbread cookies!

cookies with loquat jam filling

Wherever you might enjoy a sweet fruit, try substituting this jam, I think you’ll be happy you did! I’d love to hear what you think of this small batch loquat jam or any variations you make. Until then, happy eating!

You may enjoy these other loquat recipes…

loquat jam in a small jar
Print

Loquat Jam

Sweet and tart loquat jam made with warm vanilla and ginger to produce a thick, delicious homemade jam.
Course Breakfast, brunch, Dessert
Cuisine American
Keyword baked goods, baking, fresh fruit, homemade, jam
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Water Bath Canning (Optional) 10 minutes
Total Time 50 minutes
Servings 16 2 tbs servings
Calories 99kcal

Ingredients

  • 2 lbs loquats*
  • 1 1/2 cups white sugar
  • 1 whole vanilla bean or 3 tsp extract
  • 1/4 tsp ginger, ground or 1 tbs fresh ginger, minced

Instructions

Loquat Jam (see below for canning instructions)

  • Remove seeds, the white pith beneath the seeds, and skins from loquats. Chop to small dice.
  • Split your vanilla bean with the tip of a small knife and gently scrape the seeds from the pod out. Reserve both.
  • Combine chopped fruit, ginger, sugar, and both the vanilla bean seeds and pod in a large saucepan over medium heat.
  • Cook, stirring to dissolve the sugar. Continue to stir occasionally to prevent sticking or burning, until fruit has broken down to small pieces and the jam has thickened enough to cling to the spoon and leave a trail on the bottom of the pan when the spoon is dragged through. About 25 minutes. Discard the vanilla bean pod.
  • If canning, proceed as instructed below. If freezing or storing in the fridge, ladle into clean jars and leave about an inch from the top of the jar to the top of the jam. Let it cool completely then seal and store.
  • If canned or frozen, this jam lasts up to 1 year. If stored in the fridge, or once opened from the cupboard or freezer, this lasts one month.

Water Bath Canning

  • Before you begin cooking your jam, fill a large canning pot with enough water to cover your jars by 1 inch when submerged. Bring to a boil over high heat (make your jam while this happens).
  • Set out 4 clean 4 ounce jars (or more if doubling, etc) with NEW lids and seals on a clean towel.
  • When your jam is almost finished cooking, place your jars in the boiling water to warm them. This only takes a minute. Remove from the water, drain off excess water, and flip upside down on the towel to dry.
  • When the jam is done, use hand protection to flip over the jars. Using a ladle and funnel pour in the jam, leaving 1/4 inch of space from the top of the jam to the rim of the jar.
  • Wipe any jam from the rim and dry the rims. Then place the seals and lids on, using hand protection to handle the hot jars. Tighten the lids hand tight and use your tongs to submerge them back into the water.
  • Let them process for 10 minutes. Then remove to the towel to cool and seal. When the lids 'pop' or no longer click or move when pressed upon, the jam is ready for cupboard storage for up to 1 year.
  • Alternatively, if freezing, simply place jam in freezer safe containers with 1 inch of space from the rim, and let cool completely on the counter. Then freeze up to one year.

Notes

*This is for a small batch, 12 ounces, of jam. Feel free to double or even triple this!
*Cooking times and nutritional information are offered as a best estimate. These values may differ based upon cooking equipment and ingredient variation.

Nutrition

Serving: 2Tbs | Calories: 99kcal | Carbohydrates: 26g | Protein: 1g | Fat: 1g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 1mg | Potassium: 151mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 19g | Vitamin A: 866IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 9mg | Iron: 1mg

Originally published 7/6/2019, Updated 4/1/2020

The post Loquat Jam appeared first on The Flour Handprint.

]]>
https://www.theflourhandprint.com/small-batch-loquat-jam/feed/ 2
White Whole Wheat Bread Recipe https://www.theflourhandprint.com/white-whole-wheat-homemade-sandwich-bread/ https://www.theflourhandprint.com/white-whole-wheat-homemade-sandwich-bread/#comments Mon, 30 Mar 2020 19:45:04 +0000 http://www.theflourhandprint.com/?p=7856 This page contains affiliate links. For more information please read my Disclosure Policy. This white whole wheat bread recipe is a soft, homemade whole grain white bread ideal for sandwiches, toast and more! A combination of white whole wheat flour and bread flour result in a lovely, light bread that slices beautifully. I love bread. […]

The post White Whole Wheat Bread Recipe appeared first on The Flour Handprint.

]]>

This page contains affiliate links. For more information please read my Disclosure Policy.

This white whole wheat bread recipe is a soft, homemade whole grain white bread ideal for sandwiches, toast and more! A combination of white whole wheat flour and bread flour result in a lovely, light bread that slices beautifully.

white whole wheat sandwich bread

I love bread. I love kneading bread, the slow rise of the dough and the smell of fresh bread filling the house. I make it A LOT. I’ve shared some fun recipes like Garlic Bread Rolls and Asiago Cheese Bread. But I figured it was probably good share a staple in my house, a simple, but delicious White Whole Wheat Bread recipe that has held together many a sandwich in my kitchen.

It’s a simple combo of flours and basic bread ingredients and it’s a delicious mix of white bread and whole wheat bread. Some of the nutrition of whole grain bread, with the appearance of white bread. Your kids will never know…

Wheat Bread vs. White Bread

I know, this bread looks like white sandwich bread, but it’s not! One third of the flour is made up of a white whole wheat flour. But what really is the difference?

Simply put whole wheat flour is just that, whole. Unlike white flour, which is heavily refined, whole wheat flours still contain the germ and the bran, meaning they have a lot more nutritional value, and in my opinion, flavor. White whole wheat is simply a whole grain flour made from white wheat berries. Your typical whole wheat is made from red wheat berries that aren’t as sweet.

So if wheat flour is so much better, why use any refined flours in this recipe? The fact of the mater is that I’ve yet to get a wheat flour to behave like my white flours do. A combination creates a happy texture, flavor, and rise.

Ingredients For Sandwich Bread

Like most breads, this loaf of homemade sandwich bread is a simple combination of easy to find, common ingredients.

a bowl of flour, a bowl of yeast, a cup of milk and sugar on a wooden cutting board
  • Bread Flour – 2/3 of the flour for this recipe, and essential for developing the strong gluten that gives the bread it’s texture.
  • White Whole Wheat Flour – White whole wheat gives the bread an added natural sweetness that whole wheat flours don’t otherwise have, and it’s the reason this loaf still looks like a classic sandwich loaf.
  • Salt – ALWAYS, just always.
  • Sugar – Just a bit helps the yeast thrive, and adds flavor.
  • Yeast – Creates all that lovely air!
  • Butter – Fat equal richness and helps with texture.
  • Milk – I like milk for it’s added richness and flavor in this homemade sandwich bread.

How to Make Whole Grain White Bread

As with most bread recipes, the hardest part is the waiting! While this recipe does require some mixing and kneading, it’s all very simple and I’m going to walk you through every step!

White Whole Wheat bread recipe in stages, dough with flour on it, then dough covered to rise, then dough pressed flat on cutting board, then dough rolled up in a pan, then the bread golden brown and baked.
  1. Heat your milk to lukewarm, a max of 110°F, like a baby’s bottle. Add in half the sugar, stir, and then the yeast, stir again. This will activate your yeast, and get very bubbly and foamy in about 5 to 10 minutes.
  2. Melt your butter, and set aside to cool slightly. Then mix all of your white whole wheat flour, and the same amount (5 ounces, a cup plus two tablespoons) of bread flour in a bowl and set aside.
    1. If you don’t own a kitchen scale, but like to bake….INVEST. Accuracy, ease, and consistent baking is enough to be worth a 12 dollar scale!
  3. In a large mixing bowl, or the bowl of your stand mixer, pour in your proofed (foamy) yeast. Add in the remaining half of the sugar, salt, and the melted butter. Stir together.
  4. Add in your bowl of combined flour. Either by hand or with your stand mixer, fitted with a dough hook, on low, fold the dough together until all the flour is absorbed.
  5. The dough will still be sticky, so add in the remaining bread flour a few tablespoons at a time and knead until the dough is tacky, but no longer sticks to the bowl or your hands. This is up to about 2/3 cup but you may not need it all.
  6. Turn out your dough onto a lightly floured work surface, and begin to knead it. Push forward with the heels of your hands then fold it back on itself. Turn the dough and repeat. Continue this for about 10 minutes, or until you have a smooth soft ball of dough.
  7. Place in a large, lightly greased bowl and cover with plastic wrap or a clean kitchen towel. Let rise until doubled in size, about 1 hour.
  8. When your dough has risen, gently punch it down and turn it out onto a clean work surface. Press the dough with your hands to form a rectangle. The dough should be pliant and soft. If it snaps back when you push it, let it rest for 10 minutes and try again.
  9. Starting on the long side, roll your dough up into a cylinder, keeping it as tight as possible without squeezing the dough.
  10. Place your rolled up dough into a 9×5 loaf pan. Cover and let rise again until doubled or puffy and higher than the edge of the pan, anywhere from 45 minutes to an hour.
  11. Preheat your oven to 350°F after about 35 minutes. When your dough has risen fully, brush the top gently with a little milk and place in the preheated oven.
  12. Bake for 35 minutes, or until golden brown.
  13. Remove from oven and carefully tip the pan onto a cooling rack to remove the bread loaf from the pan. Quickly turn the bread right side up, and allow to cool completely before slicing.
  14. Slice as needed and store remaining bread in an airtight container for up to 4 to 5 days. Or, freeze for up to 4 months.

Pro Tip: Kneading is essential to this recipe. By pushing and pulling the dough you’re working the flour and creating gluten bonds that hold the bread together. Knead too little and you won’t have the close textured crumb of sandwich bread.

Step 6 – Bake!

sandwich bread loaf sliced

FAQ’S

Can I use regular whole wheat flour instead of white whole wheat flour?

Yes! It won’t have the pure white bread appearance, and may have a slightly nuttier flavor, but it’s perfectly delicious to use as a 1 to 1 replacement.

Can I use water instead of milk?

Yes! I’ve made it both with milk and water. I do think milk provides a richer flavor, but water won’t ruin the bread flavor or texture. If prefer to use no milk at all, you’ll have to brush the top of the bread with something else, like an egg wash.

The egg wash can be made with 1 egg beaten with 1 tablespoon of water.

You can also use non-dairy milks, but please be advised that they will affect flavor of the final result.

I’ve heard that milk needs to be scalded to be used with yeast…is that true?

In the years before pasteurization this was true. Bacteria, proteins, and some enzymes present in natural milk can inhibit the growth of yeast. Scalding the milk, or bringing it to a point of steaming, but not boiling, kills the bacteria, denatures the proteins, and stops those pesky enzymes from getting in the way of yeast.

Nowadays the pasteurization process most of our milks go through solves this problem for us and we can skip the scorching step. However, if you use unpasteurized milk, please follow this guide to scalding milk. Then allow it to cool to at least 110°F before adding your yeast.

Can I double this recipe?

Yes! If you’re not a fan of weekly bread baking like myself, go ahead and double away. You’ll need 2 loaf pans of course to baking at the same time. If you don’t have 2 pans, and would still like to double this recipe, you’ll have to take an extra step.

Divide the dough in half after the first rise. Shape both, place one in the pan, and the other wrapped in plastic in the fridge. Follow the recipe for the first loaf. Once your first loaf is out and cooling, let the loaf pan cool and then add the refrigerated dough to it. Let it rise at room temperature, probably closer to 1 1/2 hours since the dough is cool, and then bake as directed.

How do I freeze this bread?

Let the bread cool completely, then wrap it in plastic wrap. Slide the wrapped loaf into a plastic bag, or wrap with freezer paper, and freeze. It will keep in the freezer for up to 4 months.

To use, simply remove from the freezer, unwrap, and leave on the counter until thaw. Then store in an airtight container for 4 to 5 days.

Can I make this in a bread machine?

I don’t recommend baking this in the bread machine, but you can use it to make the dough. Simply follow your bread machine’s instructions for adding ingredients then set it to the dough cycle. When it’s done, remove and shape, then bake as directed.

Can I use instant yeast instead of active dry?

Yes, you can use instant yeast. Replace the active dry with instant 1 for 1, then skip the activation step in warm milk. Instead, simply add the yeast, salt, and sugar to the flour. Then add in the milk and melted butter. Mix as directed.

Enjoy!

Now you have a healthier, satisfying homemade sandwich bread recipe in your back pocket. It makes lovely french toast, especially if you slice it thick, but I also like enjoying any of the following recipes with it! Have fun, and as always Happy Eating!

loaf of bread sliced
Print

White Whole Wheat Homemade Sandwich Bread

Simple homemade sandwich bread made with white whole wheat, perfect for sandwiches and toast for the whole family.
Course bread, Breakfast, Lunch, Pantry Staple
Cuisine American
Keyword baked goods, bread, pantry staple
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 35 minutes
Rise Time 2 hours
Total Time 2 hours 55 minutes
Servings 12 Slices
Calories 153kcal

Ingredients

  • 10 oz whole milk + 1/2 tbs for brushing
  • 1 1/2 tsp active dry yeast
  • 2 tbs granulated sugar
  • 1 tbs butter, melted plus extra for greasing the rise bowl
  • 1 1/2 tsp salt
  • 5 oz white whole wheat flour about 1 cup
  • 9.5 oz bread flour about 2 cups, minus 2 tablespoons

Instructions

  • Microwave milk to between 95°F and 110°F. Add in yeast and 1 Tbs of sugar, stir and let sit until yeast is foamy and bubbled on top. About 5 minutes.
  • Meanwhile, melt butter and set aside. Measure white whole wheat flour and 5 ounces (about 1 cup) of bread flour into a bowl of a stand mixer* with the salt and remainder of sugar.
  • When yeast/milk mixture is ready, add it to the flour mixture with the melted butter. Fit stand mixer with a dough hook and turn on to medium speed until dough comes together in a sticky shaggy dough.
  • Begin adding remainder of bread flour 1 to 2 tablespoons at a time until dough pulls away from sides of bowl.
  • Lightly flour a clean work surface and your hands, and turn dough out onto surface. Begin kneading by pushing down and out with the palms of your hands. Rotate and fold and repeat. The dough will become less sticky as you knead, simply flour board and hands if dough sticks too much to handle, but do not over flour.
  • Knead until dough is smooth and elastic, but slightly tacky. Grease a large bowl with a little bit of butter (or oil) and form dough into a ball. Place in bowl, rotate it to coat all sides with grease, and cover with plastic wrap. Rise until doubled, 45 mins to 1 hour.
  • Get loaf pan ready by a lightly floured work surface. Turn dough out onto surface and gently press into a rectangle the same length as your loaf pan, and about 6 inches wide. Try to keep the dough even thickness.
  • Roll dough up from the long edge, keeping it tight. Place dough into the loaf pan and cover with plastic wrap. Let rise until peeking up over the edge of the pan, about 45 minutes to 1 hour.
  • After 35 minutes, preheat oven to 350°F. Check dough at 45 minutes, dough should fill out the pan, and when gently touched have a bit of resistance, but not feel dense. If needed let rise longer. When ready, brush top of loaf with reserved milk.
  • Place in oven on middle rack and bake for 35 minutes.
  • Remove from oven, and carefully remove from loaf pan immediately onto a cooling rack. Allow to cool completely before slicing or storing.
  • Store in a plastic bag in a cool cupboard for up to 5 days. When slicing use a sharp serrated knife.

Notes

*This can be made entirely by hand. Simply mix flour and liquids in a bowl until completely together then turn out onto the floured work surface and work in remaining bread flour that way. 

Nutrition

Calories: 153kcal | Carbohydrates: 28g | Protein: 5g | Fat: 2g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 5mg | Sodium: 310mg | Potassium: 71mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 3g | Vitamin A: 68IU | Calcium: 38mg | Iron: 1mg

Originally published 7/28/2019, Updated 3/31/2020

The post White Whole Wheat Bread Recipe appeared first on The Flour Handprint.

]]>
https://www.theflourhandprint.com/white-whole-wheat-homemade-sandwich-bread/feed/ 12
Asiago Bread https://www.theflourhandprint.com/asiago-bread/ https://www.theflourhandprint.com/asiago-bread/#respond Thu, 26 Mar 2020 23:59:17 +0000 https://www.theflourhandprint.com/?p=9428 This page contains affiliate links. For more information please read my Disclosure Policy. Asiago bread is an easy 6 ingredient homemade bread recipe that will yield a delicious, soft Asiago cheese loaf perfect for serving along side dinner, as the base for a crostini, or breakfast toast. Make Asiago cheese bread in just a few […]

The post Asiago Bread appeared first on The Flour Handprint.

]]>

This page contains affiliate links. For more information please read my Disclosure Policy.

Asiago bread is an easy 6 ingredient homemade bread recipe that will yield a delicious, soft Asiago cheese loaf perfect for serving along side dinner, as the base for a crostini, or breakfast toast. Make Asiago cheese bread in just a few hours, and enjoy a cheesy fresh baked treat.

a loaf of braided Asiago cheese bread

Fresh baked bread is one of those universally appreciated smells I think. That warm, yeasty scent when you walk into a bakery…mmmmm. Learning how to bake bread at home was one of the best decision I ever made, and it’s become a quick comfort to me whenever I want that bakery fresh loaf, without paying for an artisan loaf…or having to get out of my pjs.

This particular loaf is simple, and inspired by my favorite bagel, the Asiago cheese bagel (add warm cream cheese, ohhhh man). It’s soft on the inside, just chewy enough on the outside and loaded with Asiago. Seriously, 3 different ways. It’s the kind of loaf that gets devoured quickly. You may even be too impatient to use a knife.

What is Asiago?

I have a fondness for this cheese. I make a killer Asiago Cream Sauce, and often use it to replace Parmesan or Romano cheeses in recipes.

Asiago is a cows milk cheese originally produced in the northeast area of Italy that thankfully, we can get here in the states as well. Authentic Asiago cheese can come in a variety of textures based on the length of it’s aging. Fresh Asiago is sweet, soft…and basically impossible to find here. But aged, crumbly Asiago is usually available at most grocery stores.

While not nearly as popular as it’s Parmesan and Romano cousins you can usually find one or two brands available. It’s nutty, salty, and downright delicious.

The Six ingredients

Yes. Only 6. Bread at it’s most basic can be as simple as yeast, water, and flour. This one adds just a few more for added flavor.

a bowl of flour, a bowl of honey, a bowl of yeast, a wedge of white cheese, and a carafe of water with a white towel
  • Bread Flour – Bread flour is a wonderful, high protein flour that contains more gluten than your average AP flour. It results in beautiful texture and chew in this loaf.
  • Water – Just some regular ole’ water.
  • Yeast – I always use active dry. To use instant yeast, skip step 1 below.
  • Asiago – You’ll need 3 to 4 ounces total. The average wedge at the store will do just fine.
  • Honey – A little sweetness for the bread, which balances the cheese flavor, and helps feed the yeast for good rise.
  • Salt – Because all delicious things include some salt!
  • OPTIONAL: I always brush a bread loaf with an egg wash before baking for color and shine. (1 egg with 1/2 tbs of water) This is optional, you can also use milk, heavy cream, honey or even just water to help the final layer of cheese stick.

Pro Tip – Only have AP flour? It can replace bread flour 1:1 in this recipe (and most bread recipes). The results will be a little less airy/chewy, but still entirely delicious!

How to Make Asiago Bread

Ingredients gathered? Let’s begin. With some basic, standard bread making techniques, you’ll be off to the oven in just a few hours. (Most of which you won’t actually be doing anything to the bread!)

Asiago bread in steps: the yeast proofing, the dough together, cheese added to the dough, the dough ball fully kneaded, then the dough risen.

The First Rise

  1. First, warm your water up to between 100° and 110°F. Think baby’s bath water warm. Stir in the honey until dissolved, then add the yeast. Stir and let sit 10 minutes until bubbly and foamy on top. (Skip to #2 if using instant yeast.)
  2. Combine the flour and salt in a bowl, then add in the proofed yeast. Fold it together until a shaggy dough forms. Then using your hands, knead until no dry flour is visible any more and it stops being sticky about 5 minutes.
  3. Turn out onto a floured surface and add 1 ounce, or 1/2 cup of finely shredded Asiago cheese to the dough. Knead until completely smooth, soft, and elastic. About 7 to 10 minutes.
  4. Form into a tight ball and place in a lightly floured bowl. Dust the top with flour (lightly), and cover with plastic wrap.
  5. Let it rise until doubled, about 1 hour.

PRO TIPS: It’s better to use cooler water to proof yeast than water that’s too hot. Heat will kill yeast!

Don’t add too much flour to the dough! If it sticks to your hands when you turn it onto a floured surface, lightly flour your hands while kneading. Once the visible flour has disappeared, continue to flour your hands until the dough no longer sticks to them.

The Second Rise

asiago bread dough flattened with a hand holding chunks of cheese above it.
  1. Remove your bread dough from the bowl onto a clean surface and flatten into a rectangle. No need for perfection here. Scatter small chunks of Asiago across it. About another 1 ounce, or 1/4 cup.
Asiago bread process, part 2. The dough shaped, then cut into three pieces, then braided, the risen with more cheese on top
  1. Roll the dough from one long end to the other to form a log, pinching the seam to seal it.
  2. Place it seam side down on your work surface and flatten gently with the palm of your hand, just enough to make 2 slices, forming 3 segments. Don’t cut all the way through both ends, leave one end in tact.
  3. Begin braiding your 3 segments together. Don’t pull, but braid it tightly together by working slowly, avoiding gaps between the braid.
  4. At the end of the loaf, press the 3 segments together and tuck under the end of the loaf. Transfer to a baking sheet or stone. Cover loosely with plastic again and let rise another 45 minutes to 1 hour, or until very puffy and doubled in size.
  5. If using, brush the dough very gently with your chosen wash. I use 1 egg beaten with 1/2 tbs of water which gives it shine and color. You can also use water, milk, cream, or honey. Top with the remaining 1 ounce of Asiago, shredded thickly.
  6. Bake at 325°F for 30 – 35 minutes. The bread should be browned, and the bottom hollow when tapped (careful, it’s hot!).
  7. Remove from baking sheet to a cooling rack and let cool completely before slicing. OR just tear into it and accept that you won’t have neat slices!

Pro Tip: Use a thick, sturdy baking sheet or stone for your bread to avoid premature browning of the bottom.

a loaf of sliced asiago bread

FAQ’S

How long will this keep for?

Most fresh baked bread will last 3 to 4 days before the texture gets dry. I’ve found that wrapped in plastic or kept in a zip top bag that this loaf can last about 5…if it makes it that long.

Can I freeze this?

Absolutely. Wrap tightly in plastic or freezer paper and freeze for up to 4 months.

I can see some of the chunks of cheese poking through the dough when I braid it. Is that okay?

Yes. Feel free to press them gently back in, but I didn’t worry about it at all. It bakes just fine!

Can I substitute other cheeses?

Feel free to use any hard, aged cheese like Parmesan or Romano.

What happens if I don’t brush the dough with anything before baking?

You may see less browning when it’s finished. To assist the cheese in sticking, you can brush the dough very gently with a small amount of water.

Can I use a stand mixer?

You can use a stand mixer to get the dough ready for the first rise. I recommend keeping it on a speed similar to what you would work at if doing it by hand. Be sure to stop the machine and scrape down the sides and bottom so the dough kneads evenly.

Do I have to braid it?

No. Feel free to shape it as you wish. I like the braid because it catches all the cheese on top and creates more cheesy crust. Be advised that shaping it into a ball may require more bake time, or if into smaller loaves less.

a loaf of asiago cheese bread

You may also like…

That’s it! You’ve got delicious cheesy bread with a lovely soft interior texture. It’s hard to beat that ingredient list am I right? Enjoy it with a nice Gnocchi Tomato Pasta or something saucy like Dr. Pepper Braised Short Ribs, Orange and Chicken Braise, or even just slathered with butter and warm along side a simple Tomato Spinach Salad.

Don’t forget to check out these other awesome bread recipes!

a sliced loaf of asiago bread
Print

Asiago Bread

Cheesy, soft and simple Asiago bread is an easy yeast risen bread recipe that goes well with any meal.
Course bread
Cuisine American
Keyword baking, bread, side dish, yeast
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 35 minutes
Rise time 2 hours
Total Time 3 hours 5 minutes
Servings 12
Calories 161kcal
Author Mikayla M

Ingredients

  • 13.5-15 ounces bread flour 3 cups, plus additional 1/3 cup
  • 8 ounces warm water 1 cup
  • 2 1/4 tsp active dry yeast* 1 packet
  • 3 ounces Asiago Cheese, divided
  • 1 Tbs honey
  • 1 tsp salt

Optional

  • 1 egg
  • 1/2 Tbs water

Instructions

  • Combine warm water (no hotter than 110°F) and honey until dissolved. Mix in yeast and let proof until foamy and bubbly on top. About 10 minutes.
  • Finely shred 1 ounce of Asiago cheese, about 1/2 cup, not packed.
  • Combine 13.5 ounces of flour (3 cups, spooned and leveled) and salt in a large bowl and stir in the yeast water mixture until shaggy dough forms. Knead until no visible flour is left and dough is tacky but not sticky, about 5 minutes.*
  • Lightly flour a clean surface and turn dough onto it. Add shredded cheese to the top and knead together until dough is smooth and soft, 7 to 10 minutes.
  • Form into ball and place in a lightly floured large bowl. Lightly flour the top and cover with plastic wrap. Let rise 1 hour, or until doubled in size.
  • When dough is nearly doubled, cut another 1 ounce of cheese into small, 1/2 inch chunks. About 1/4 cup.
  • Turn risen dough out onto a clean surface and press gently into a rectangle. Sprinkle with chunks of cheese.
  • Roll into a log along the long side, pinching the seam to seal and place seam side down.
  • Press gently to flatten top and with a sharp knife, make two long cuts, staring about 1 inch from one end all the way through the other end. This should create 3 segments of dough connected at one end.
  • Braid the segments together as tightly as possible to avoid any gaps in the braid. At the end of the loaf, press the 3 segments back together and tuck under the loaf.
  • Transfer to a baking sheet or stone and lightly cover with plastic or a dish towel again until doubled in size, about 45 minutes.
  • Preheat oven to 325°F and shred remaining 1 ounce of cheese in thick shreds.
  • If using egg wash, beat together the egg and water and gently brush onto risen loaf. You can also use milk, cream, honey, or simply water. Sprinkle cheese on top.
  • Bake for 30 to 35 minutes or until bread is browned and sounds hollow when you tap on the bottom.
  • Remove to a cooling rack and let cool completely before slicing. Store in an airtight container for up to 5 days.

Notes

*If using instant yeast instead of active dry, skip step 1 and mix all the ingredients together in a large bowl. 
*If dough sticks to hands while kneading in the 13.5 ounces of flour, lightly dust hands with flour and knead. Repeat until the dough is no longer sticking to you. 
*Egg wash provides sheen and color but isn’t necessary, use a very light coat of water to help cheese stick if no other wash is desired. 

Nutrition

Serving: 1slice | Calories: 161kcal | Carbohydrates: 26g | Protein: 8g | Fat: 3g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 18mg | Sodium: 315mg | Potassium: 65mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 2g | Vitamin A: 75IU | Calcium: 91mg | Iron: 1mg

The post Asiago Bread appeared first on The Flour Handprint.

]]>
https://www.theflourhandprint.com/asiago-bread/feed/ 0
Homemade Nut Butter – A Complete Guide https://www.theflourhandprint.com/homemade-nut-butter/ https://www.theflourhandprint.com/homemade-nut-butter/#comments Tue, 24 Mar 2020 00:43:00 +0000 http://theflourhandprint.com/?p=7125 Homemade nut butter is so easy to make and fun to customize with different flavors. Use this complete guide to make any nut into creamy, delicious nut butter.

The post Homemade Nut Butter – A Complete Guide appeared first on The Flour Handprint.

]]>

This page contains affiliate links. For more information please read my Disclosure Policy.

Homemade nut butter is easy to make and often more inexpensive compared to the artisan flavored nut butters you’d buy at the grocery. Natural nut butter requires nothing more than nuts, but with these helpful tips you can easily learn how to make your own nut butter a little more gourmet.

an overhead shot of a jar of homemade peanut butter

Oh peanut butter, my go to dip for apples and carrots, my breakfast spread, my eat a spoonful snack…okay you get it, I freaking love peanut butter. Actually, I love all sorts of nut butters, almond, cashew, there are so many options now it’s hard to choose! Sadly, if you’re looking for natural nut butters, they can get pretty pricey!

The good news is…Homemade nut butter is ridiculously simple. In less than 10 minutes, I can have fresh nut butter, catered to exactly my tastes and whims, without the gourmet price tag.

I’m going to walk you through how to make your own nut butter, with any nut and flavor you choose! You’ll also find a recipe for my personal favorite, Maple Cinnamon peanut butter at the end.

A plate with a slice of bread topped with peanut butter

Choosing Your Nuts – Key Tips

The beauty of making your own homemade nut butter is that you can do whatever suits your needs or cravings that day. Want cinnamon honey almond butter? Or maybe vanilla spiced pecan butter? A simple maple peanut butter? Any and all can be made very, very simply.

almonds, peanuts, and pecans laid out on a table in three rows
  • Buy nuts in bulk – it takes several cups to produce a reasonable amount of nut butter. Since nuts last a good while (longer if you store them sealed tightly in the fridge), buy in bulk and never be without!
  • Buy Roasted, Unsalted nuts – Whenever possible I prefer pre-roasted, but not salted nuts. This allows me to control the salt level, but cuts out the roasting/cooling step. If that’s not available, I’d personally go with the unsalted option, and roast them myself!

Natural Oils in Nuts

It’s also important to consider level of oil in the nut you pick. The higher the oil level, the more oil that will be released during blending, and the more liquid your nut butter will be. The nuts with lower oil content might need some added to reach the texture you like. Here’s a handy list of fat content in nuts.

a chart listing the oil content in common nuts
*This percentage is for the English Walnut (the most commonly eaten in the US). For Black walnuts the oil content is 59% and will work just as well.

When making homemade peanut butter, extra oil is unnecessary (for me). Peanuts produce PLENTY of oil, once they’ve been allowed to grind properly.

My advice is to blend first, add oil later. Many recipes call for added oil, but in my tests that produced a loose, liquid like nut butter that became drippy when it came to room temp. Let your nuts blend, it takes time, and ONLY if they’re ground into a smooth paste and you find it too thick, add oil. If needed, usually a tablespoon or two of something flavorless, like canola, vegetable, or grapeseed oil is perfect to get those nut butters to your ideal texture.

If you’re using a nut with a higher oil content than peanuts, you’ll be fine, if it seems loose, it will thicken in the fridge.

PRO TIP: Seeds can also be made into butter! (Think sunbutter made from sunflower seeds or tahini from sesame seeds) If you’re itching to try it, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, and poppy seeds all contain natural oils in the range of 45-50%, so go for it! Toast and blend, same process!

Flavoring your Nut Butter

brown sugar, white sugar and honey in bowls surrounded by whole cloves and cinnamon sticks

This is where your homemade nut butter goes from simple and easy to gourmet. While I ALWAYS recommend a pinch or two of salt (unless you’re using salted nuts), you can flavor your spreads any way you like. Common ingredients include sweeteners and spices.

Sweeteners – Most sugars I’ve tried work great! While syrup sugars work, add them slowly, they can produce a sticky texture if you add too much.

  • Brown or White sugar
  • Honey
  • Maple Syrup
  • Date Syrup
  • Agave
  • Corn Syrup

Spices – Let your creativity shine!! I’ve yet to find a spice that doesn’t blend in nicely. Start with 1/2 tsp (less for powerful spices like cayenne or clove).

  • Vanilla – go with fresh scraped beans or paste
  • Cloves
  • Allspice
  • Cinnamon
  • Nutmeg
  • Ginger
  • Black Pepper
  • Cayenne

Get Creative! – There are so many possibilties I’m sure I haven’t even thought of yet. Here are a few suggestions for unique additions.

  • Cocoa Powder (nutella anyone?)
  • Espresso Powder (because why not!)
  • Flax seed – a lovely health boost, and a nutty flavor!

PRO TIP: It’s also useful to know that some nuts have a natural sweetness thanks to free sugar content in their makeup. Pistachios, cashews, and pine nuts have more free sugars than others and may require little or no added sugar.

You certainly don’t have to add flavorings at all! If you like the pure flavor of a nut, you can blend and enjoy. Or, if you’re feeling like a shortcut buy flavored nuts like honey roasted peanuts or cocoa almonds to make your nut butter!

PRO TIP: Be wary of water based flavoring agents! Liquid extracts like vanilla can make your nut butter seize up and become unpleasant. Instead, add fresh vanilla bean or paste. Always wait until the end to add your flavorings and use syrups sparingly!

Making Homemade Nut Butter

Alright, you’ve chosen your nuts, and you’re ready to make some homemade nut butter. It’s so simple with just a few steps. I recommend a food processor or a quality blender to get the job done.

nut butter in four stages, whole nuts, ground nuts, a smooth paste, then with flavors added to it.
  1. Add your nuts to your blender/processor. Blend until creamy. This will go through several stages.
  2. First, your nuts will turn into crumbs, scrape down the sides with a spatula and blend again.
  3. It will turn to a crumbly paste. Keep blending, occasionally scraping down the sides. As the nuts get finer the oils will release and a paste will form.
  4. If you like chunky nut butter, stop when you’ve reached a happy place. If you like it completely smooth, keep blending.
  5. Add Flavorings. When you’ve hit a consistency you like, add your flavors. Blend to incorporate and taste. Adjust if needed. Once the flavors are to your liking…you’re done!
  6. Store in jar or container in the fridge. Without stabilizers like the store bought stuff, your nut butter needs the cold. Be sure to keep your homemade nut butter in the refrigerator, where it will keep for 4 weeks. You can also freeze it for up to 4 months.

You can expect this entire process to take about 10 to 15 minutes in your average food processor. If you have a high powdered blender like a ninja, it took about 4 to 5 one minute cycles.

PRO TIP: A blender will produce more heat when making natural nut butter. It’s best to work in cycles, blend for a minute or two, scrape down the sides, repeat.

a plate with a slice of bread topped with peanut butter and red jelly in front of an apple and two jars

FAQ’S

Why did my nut butter seize up? (Get gritty/lumpy/not smooth)

If there is any water based liquid added to your mixture while blending this can cause nuts to seize. Avoid vanilla or other extracts, juices, and make sure your blender or processor bowl is dry and clean before beginning.

How can I make chunky nut butter?

Two choices, either blend to the point of it having small chunks and stop. (Adding some oil may be needed if you don’t blend the nuts smooth.) OR, blend into a smooth paste and add coarsely chopped nuts, mixing them in like you would a batter.

Oil has separated from my nut butter in storage!

This is common for nuts with high oil content, simply stir it in and use. I find this happens less in the fridge, almost never with peanuts or other low oil nuts.

Can I mix nuts?

Hey, there are no rules here! Maybe Pistachio almond butter is the new thing!

Go Nuts!

Now you know everything you need to make homemade nut butter, so go on! Next time your at the market, take a glance at those fancy gourmet nut butters, check out the flavors, and then walk away with a smile and make it yourself for cheaper. As always, happy eating!

While you’re here, check out these other pantry staples you can make at home:

a jar of peanut butter in front of a sliced apple and plate
Print

Homemade Nut Butter (Maple Cinnamon Peanut Butter Suggestion)

Follow these instructions to make any type of homemade nut butter. For inspiration, try my suggestion for a maple cinnamon peanut butter!
Course Condiment
Cuisine American
Keyword condiment, nuts, pantry staple
Prep Time 15 minutes
Total Time 15 minutes
Servings 64
Calories 56kcal
Author Mikayla M

Ingredients

General Nut Butter

  • 4 cups nut of choice
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1-2 Tbs sweetener of choice Start with less, add more as needed
  • 1-2 Tbs neutral oil optional, ONLY if needed*

Maple Cinnamon Peanut Butter

  • 4 cups roasted, unsalted peanuts
  • 1 1/2 Tbs pure maple syrup
  • 1/2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp kosher salt

Instructions

General Nut Butter

  • Add nut of choice, to blender or food processor and blend until smooth. Pause occasionally to scrape down sides. 
    In a good blender, 4 – 5 one minute cycles while scraping down the sides in between should work. In the food processor, expect 10-12 minutes.
  • Add salt, sweetener, and oil if you want a thinner butter. Blend and taste, adjust as needed. 
  • Store in jar in the fridge. This recipe makes 2.5 cups of nut butter.

Maple Cinnamon Peanut Butter

  • Follow the same instructions as above, using peanuts as nut of choice. Add in maple syrup, salt, and cinnamon at end and blend to combine, then store in fridge.

Notes

*Do not add oil until the end. The nuts WILL release oil as blended, but it will not seem like it at first. 
Nut butter will thicken in fridge. 
Avoid water based flavorings like extracts or juices to prevent seizing.
Nutrition facts and cooking times are offered as a best estimate. Values will vary based upon ingredients and equipment.

Nutrition

Serving: 1Tbs | Calories: 56kcal | Carbohydrates: 2g | Protein: 2g | Fat: 5g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 82mg | Potassium: 63mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 1g | Calcium: 6mg | Iron: 1mg

Originally Published 4/28/2019, Updated 3/29/2020

The post Homemade Nut Butter – A Complete Guide appeared first on The Flour Handprint.

]]>
https://www.theflourhandprint.com/homemade-nut-butter/feed/ 10
How to Make Sweetened Condensed Milk https://www.theflourhandprint.com/homemade-sweetened-condensed-milk/ https://www.theflourhandprint.com/homemade-sweetened-condensed-milk/#comments Mon, 23 Mar 2020 23:55:00 +0000 http://theflourhandprint.com/?p=6851 This page contains affiliate links. For more information please read my Disclosure Policy. Homemade sweetened condensed milk is a simple process that only requires 2 ingredients, milk and sugar! Read on to learn how to make sweetened condensed milk, including dairy free versions, and get all the tips you need for making and using your […]

The post How to Make Sweetened Condensed Milk appeared first on The Flour Handprint.

]]>

This page contains affiliate links. For more information please read my Disclosure Policy.

Homemade sweetened condensed milk is a simple process that only requires 2 ingredients, milk and sugar! Read on to learn how to make sweetened condensed milk, including dairy free versions, and get all the tips you need for making and using your homemade batch.

a glass jar with sweetened condensed milk, a spoon held above it, drizzling it back in.

Sweetened condensed milk is one of those things that you don’t need until you need, at least in my kitchen! I usually had a can lurking in the back of my pantry. It moved from apartment to apartment…until I needed it one day when I decided to test out making my own homemade coffee creamer, and I realized it was way past acceptably expired.

I quickly learned that making your own isn’t only easy, it’s better. Sweet, syrupy thickened milk all warm and delicious…it’s seriously scrumptious enough lick from your spoon…and pot. (No judgement here!). Bonus is, even using organic milk, it winds up being as inexpensive, if not cheaper than the store bought stuff. This is especially true if you’re in the market for dairy free sweetened condensed milk. Plus, you can make it when you need, freeze the extra, and cut out that last minute store run!

The Ingredients

Thankfully, homemade sweetened condensed milk is remarkably simple. Milk and sugar is all you really need. In an easy, 3 to 1 ratio of milk to sugar, I thought I’d share some tips on choosing the milk and sugar that work for you.

three bowls of milk, and 1 bowl of white sugar, a whisk and a wooden skewer on a red checked napkin

Milk – Choosing milk is important! Your choice will absolutely affect the thickness, richness, and flavor of the final product. A few tips…

  • A full fat milk will yield a creamier, thicker product. Whole cow’s milk is my preference, but you can even use heavy cream if you’re after a seriously luscious final product.
  • You can use ANY non-dairy milk you want! Almond milk will yield a thinner, runnier condensed milk while coconut will be very thick.
  • Depending on your milk choice and you’re intended use, you may need to reduce it less or more than my recipe to get the right thickness.

Sugar – for the most similar flavor to the canned condensed milk, white granulated sugar is my preference. However, you again have choices! A few tips, and warnings, to get you going on the right foot.

  • The sugar you use has a strangely minute effect on final flavor. Using the most expensive cane sugar I could find didn’t produce a better homemade condensed milk than generic granulated sugar.
  • You can use: Granulated, cane, turbanido, coconut sugar, or even pure maple syrup (so expensive though!).
  • Brown sugar contains molasses and due to the acidity content of molasses, this can cause curdling in your condensed milk. I personally have not had any issues with turbanido sugar, but brown sugar has on occasion caused this. Since it makes NO difference in flavor, I don’t recommend doing this.
  • Stevia or Splenda, or any other sugar alternatives do NOT work the same as sugar. I recommend using only sugar substitutes that can be exchanged in baking as a 1 to 1 replacement.

Other Ingredients – When I first began testing, many recipes called for butter, baking soda, or vanilla. I found each of them completely unnecessary.

  • While butter may lend richness, it also separated in the jar after cooking. Condensed milk is plenty rich on it’s own.
  • Vanilla may add flavor, but it really, really isn’t needed. Instead, wait to add flavoring until you’re using your sweetened condensed milk in your recipe.
  • Baking soda, as food scientist reader kindly pointed out, can aid in the caramelizing of the sugars. This is only really desired if you’re cooking past the point of sweetened condensed milk into dulce de leche. If that’s the case, go ahead and add a half teaspoon or so.

My advice – keep it simple and inexpensive, just use milk and sugar.

How to Make Sweetened Condensed Milk

Making homemade condensed milk is a very simple process! What’s important is the ratio and the time. 3 cups (24 ounces) of milk and 1 cup of sugar is the perfect ratio for ideal sweetness and thickening. With whole milk, this yields about 1 cup of condensed milk.

For those using skim, almond, or other thinner milks, to achieve a thicker end result you’ll have to reduce longer and therefore it will yield less.

Pro Tip: Using your condensed milk for drinks like Thai iced tea or homemade coffee creamer? Reduce your milk less for a thinner, more beverage friendly end result.

a large metal pot with milk in it, a skewer dipped in to measure the level

Making homemade sweetened condensed milk is as simple as the ratio. Mix milk and sugar, reduce. That’s it. The name really does say it all, you’re simply condensing milk with a sweetener.

Fast Method – adding sugar to milk changes the nature of it, reducing the risk of scorching your milk. This makes it possible to cook your condensed milk in under an hour. Be advised, the scorching risk is reduced, not eliminated.

  1. Combine your milk and sugar in a pot and place it over medium high heat.
  2. Stir as it heats to dissolve the sugar.
  3. Continue to stir until the mixture comes to a gentle boil, then babysit.
  4. Stir frequently. Scrape along the bottom to prevent scorching, until your milk is reduced by 2/3 and thickened.

Slow Method – This method lets time and gentle evaporation do the job while you’re free to wander away and work on other things! (If you’re curious, remove the sugar and you can make evaporated milk this way too!)

  1. Combine milk and sugar in a pot and place is over medium high heat.
  2. Stir as it heats to dissolve the sugar.
  3. Continue to stir until it comes to a gentle boil, then crank it down to low. Continue to stir until the mixture is steaming rapidly, but not bubbling.
  4. Give it a stir every 20 minutes or so, until your mixture has reduced by 2/3, around 3 hours.

When your done, regardless of the method you choose. Pour your condensed milk into a storage jar and allow to cool. It will thicken as it cools. Seal and store in the fridge for up to 1 month, or in the freezer for up to 3.

Bonus tip – to check how much the milk has reduced, you just need a wooden skewer and a marker. When you first put the pot on, mark the milk level with the marker. When the milk level is one third the height of the original, you’re all done.

a mason jar pouring condensed milk into a smaller jar on a red checked napkin

FAQ’S

It’s not as thick as I wanted it, even after cooling, can I fix it?

Yes, if you’re not happy with the thickness you can reduce it further by returning it to a pot and cooking it more.

Is it possible to can condensed milk for shelf storage?

The only way I know of to make homemade condensed milk safe for shelf storage is to use a pressure canner. If you have one, refer to your pressure canners instructions to do this safely.

Can I make it with evaporated milk?

Yes, If you have a can of evaporated milk, you can dissolve sugar into it over gentle heat to create a similar product.

Can I make it with powdered milk?

Yes, it can be made with powdered milk if you have more of that available to you than powdered milk. Here’s a link to a great blog post on how to make it with powdered milk!

My condensed milk cooked too long and started to look like caramel, is it bad?

NO! While it may not have been your intention, the stage beyond condensed milk is dulce de leche. Delicious, caramel and definitely not ruined. Whether you’ve cooked it all the way down to real dulce de leche or you have just a hint of caramel flavor, it’s fine to use.

a mason jar pouring condensed milk into a glass jar

Uses for Sweetened Condensed Milk

Odds are if you’re looking for this kind of recipe, you probably needed sweetened condensed milk and found yourself in a pinch like I did. I hope you’re well on your way to whatever you needed it for now!

If however you end up loving your homemade sweetened condensed milk as much as I did and you’re looking for excuses to use it more often, here are my favorite suggestions!

a glass jar of homemade sweetened condensed milk on a red and white checked napkin
Print

Homemade Sweetened Condensed Milk

Just two simple ingredients is all it takes to make sweet, syrupy homemade condensed milk for all your baking needs!
Course Pantry Staple
Cuisine American
Keyword ingredients, pantry staple
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 3 hours
Total Time 3 hours 5 minutes
Servings 4
Calories 407kcal

Ingredients

  • 1 Cup Sugar Use sugar of choice: granulated, cane, turbanido etc.
  • 3 Cups Milk Any milk of choice!

Instructions

  • Combine sugar and milk in a large pot over medium heat.
  • Bring to a boil, stirring to prevent burning. 
  • Once boiling, reduce heat to low, maintaining enough heat to keep milk steaming.*
  • Stir every 20 to 30 minutes until milk has reduced by two thirds, or is close to desired thickness. (It will thicken as it cools)
  • Pour into storage jar and allow to cool. Seal tightly and store in fridge up to 1 month. 

Notes

Measure how much your milk has reduced by marking initial levels on a wooden skewer or chopstick and comparing over the course of a few hours.
*I’ve had success with brown sugar, but due to the molasses content in brown sugar, it can cause curdled milk. I recommend using turbanido sugar if you’d like to use brown sugar, or sticking to white sugar. (It really doesn’t affect flavor)
*If you prefer a quicker reduction, keep the heat at medium high and stir almost constantly until reduced to desired point. There is an increased risk of scorching, so don’t leave it. 

Nutrition

Calories: 407kcal | Carbohydrates: 78g | Protein: 8g | Fat: 8g | Saturated Fat: 5g | Cholesterol: 24mg | Sodium: 106mg | Potassium: 322mg | Sugar: 79g | Vitamin A: 395IU | Calcium: 276mg | Iron: 1mg

Originally published 3/15/2019, Updated 3/23/2020

The post How to Make Sweetened Condensed Milk appeared first on The Flour Handprint.

]]>
https://www.theflourhandprint.com/homemade-sweetened-condensed-milk/feed/ 12
Homemade Coffee Creamer https://www.theflourhandprint.com/homemade-coffee-creamer-2/ https://www.theflourhandprint.com/homemade-coffee-creamer-2/#comments Mon, 16 Mar 2020 00:44:00 +0000 http://theflourhandprint.com/?p=6877 This page contains affiliate links. For more information please read my Disclosure Policy. Homemade coffee creamer is easy to make and insanely delicious! With just two key ingredients and flavorings of choice, you can make your own homemade coffee creamer with sweetened condensed milk. Once you’ve tried out a homemade coffee creamer recipe, the store […]

The post Homemade Coffee Creamer appeared first on The Flour Handprint.

]]>

This page contains affiliate links. For more information please read my Disclosure Policy.

Homemade coffee creamer is easy to make and insanely delicious! With just two key ingredients and flavorings of choice, you can make your own homemade coffee creamer with sweetened condensed milk. Once you’ve tried out a homemade coffee creamer recipe, the store stuff won’t compare!

There are days I wish I liked my coffee black like my husband does. No fuss, just pour and go. Buuuut…sipping a cup of coffee black is just not going to happen.

I’ve tasted and sampled my way through so many store bought variations. The powdered stuff, the sugar free (and oddly sweet?) stuff, the dairy free, the pure and natural cream based, all of it. Some of it’s been okay, but truth be told, the BEST coffee creamer I’ve ever had is the one I make at home.

It’s smooth, sweet, and flavored just the way I like it. Heck I can even change the flavor week to week! The best part is that I know exactly what’s in it. I even make my own condensed milk, so from start to finish, it’s completely made from scratch. Trust me on this one, if you give homemade coffee creamer a try, you’ll be a convert too.

Homemade Coffee Creamer with Sweetened condensed Milk

There are lots of ways to make creamer out there. Evaporated milk, coconut cream, simple syrups are all potential options. But the best combo in my opinion that requires minimal effort for biggest, most satisfying flavor pay off is milk and sweetened condensed milk.

  • Sweetened Condensed Milk: This is the sweetening agent in your homemade creamer. You’re more than welcome to use the canned stuff, either traditional or non-dairy. Or, you can whip up your own with my easy recipe for Homemade Sweetened Condensed Milk (also can be made vegan/non-dairy!)
  • Milk: The second major ingredient, necessary to thin out the sweetened condensed milk and tame the sweetness. You can choose whatever milk you please, cow, coconut, nut, or soy.
  • Flavoring: Now this is where you can get really wild. Add cocoa powder, cinnamon, vanilla, maple, whatever makes you happy!

Two Methods to Homemade Coffee Creamer

Depending on the flavors you choose to add to your coffee creamer, and how you choose to add them, the way you mix up your creamer will differ.

The Cold, Shake it Up Method

This easy, no fuss method works best for flavoring agents that blend easily. Extracts, powdered spices, or syrups.

  1. Place condensed milk, milk, and desired flavorings in a mason jar or storage jar of choice.
  2. Shake vigorously until combined. Enjoy!
  3. Refrigerate and shake again before using.

Heat Infusion Method

This method is ideal for enriching your homemade creamer with deep flavor. It also opens up your flavoring options to things like whole spices, cocoa powder, tea packets, or espresso powder. These ingredients incorporate best with some heat applied, and result in a decadent creamer!

  1. If using whole spices, place them in a pot over medium high heat first. Toast lightly, gently shaking the pan every minute or so.
    1. If you’re not using whole spices, skip step one!
  2. When they’re fragrant and toasty (2 to 3 minutes), pour in your milk and condensed milk into the pan.
  3. Heat milks until just steaming.
    1. If adding cocoa powder, espresso powder, or any other ingredients stir in now, continuing to stir over heat until there are no clumps and everything is smooth and delicious. Remove from heat and pour into storage jar and let cool before refrigerating.
    2. If using whole spices or tea, turn off heat and cover the pan. Let it steep until the mixture has cooled enough to touch then pour into a storage jar and refrigerate.

Bonus Tip: If you want to strain out any spices before storing, do so. Otherwise, let them stay in with the creamer. The flavors will strengthen slowly in the fridge, your best cup may even be the last one in the jar!

Coffee Creamer REcipe Ratios

How sweet and thick you like your creamer is going to affect the ratio you prefer of sweetened condensed milk to regular milk. Personally I like a ratio of 1:1.

Depending on your flavor preferences, here are some suggestions on how much to add:

  • Ground spices: I’d start with 1 tsp and work your way up. I found cinnamon and ginger I needed a touch more, but for cloves, nutmeg, and allspice less. Feel free to mix them! I also recommend a splash of vanilla extract for these too!
  • Cocoa powder: I like 2 tablespoons for that much creamer.
  • Whole spices: One cinnamon stick, 4 allspice berries, or 4 cloves were perfect!
  • Vanilla Extract: 1.5 to 2 tablespoons was perfect!
  • Maple, Peppermint, Hazelnut, or Almond Extract: 2 teaspoons was just enough!
  • Chocolate syrup: 2 Tablespoons
  • Tea: Steep one to two tea bags of your preferred flavor (lavender, ginger, cinnamon apple, chai), remove when desired flavor is reached!

Feel free to experiment! I’m still learning and tasting what goes well, and would love to hear what flavors you come up with. I’m considering a tumeric ginger flavor next, yum!

Give your creamer a good shake before using, regardless of the flavors you choose, and you’re good to go!

FAQ’S

How long does homemade creamer last?

This depends on the milk you’ve added. Your coffee creamer is best consumed by the expiration date of your earliest expiring ingredient. For example if you use milk expiring in two days, your creamer won’t last very long.

I make my creamer as I buy milk, and find that 1 cup of condensed milk and 1 cup of milk lasts me a week or two, long enough to last without any waste.

Non-dairy milks usually expire less quickly, and coconut milk is an excellent alternative that has a longer shelf life (the cartons. Using canned coconut milk has a LOT of fat that you will taste)

Can I freeze it?

Certainly. Condensed milk freezes well, so it’s ideal for this. However regular milk may have some separation. Mix up your creamer, freeze, then thaw as needed (up to 3 months in the freezer is fine). Be sure to vigorously shake before each use, and you’re good to go!

Is this better for me than store bought creamer?

I’m not going to claim that drinking anything with sweetened condensed milk is necessarily healthy. BUT, there are no strange ingredients, no preservatives, and you can flavor is as desired. In my book, that’s better every time.

Enjoy!

I hope this homemade coffee creamer recipe makes you as happy as it does me. I sincerely enjoy my morning (and evening, shhh) cups so much more now. It’s easy, even if you’re just using it in a pinch or to test it out. Have fun!

If you liked this, you may also enjoy these beverage recipes:

a jar of homemade coffee creamer
Print

Homemade Coffee Creamer

It’s a simple combination of sweetened condensed milk, regular milk, and flavoring. And it’s the best creamer you’ll ever add to your coffee!
Course Drinks
Cuisine American
Prep Time 10 minutes
Total Time 10 minutes
Servings 28
Calories 48kcal

Ingredients

Instructions

  • Combine ingredients in a jar or bottle and shake until combined. 
  • Store in fridge. Will last as long as the earliest expiring ingredient. 

Notes

Post contains NUMEROUS suggestions on different flavors and how to best combine them. Read above for alternatives to this classic vanilla coffee creamer.

Nutrition

Serving: 2tbs | Calories: 48kcal | Carbohydrates: 8g | Protein: 1g | Fat: 1g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 5mg | Sodium: 18mg | Potassium: 54mg | Sugar: 8g | Vitamin A: 38IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 40mg | Iron: 1mg

Originally published 3/19/2019, Updated 3/15/2020

The post Homemade Coffee Creamer appeared first on The Flour Handprint.

]]>
https://www.theflourhandprint.com/homemade-coffee-creamer-2/feed/ 12
Easy Cream Cheese Frosting https://www.theflourhandprint.com/easy-cream-cheese-frosting/ https://www.theflourhandprint.com/easy-cream-cheese-frosting/#respond Tue, 03 Mar 2020 08:59:48 +0000 https://www.theflourhandprint.com/?p=9354 This page contains affiliate links. For more information please read my Disclosure Policy. Whip up this easy cream cheese frosting for cupcakes, cinnamon rolls, or stacked cakes in just a few minutes. It’s the perfect, pipeable cream cheese frosting that balances sweet with buttery smooth texture and just a hint of cream cheese tang. It’s […]

The post Easy Cream Cheese Frosting appeared first on The Flour Handprint.

]]>

This page contains affiliate links. For more information please read my Disclosure Policy.

Whip up this easy cream cheese frosting for cupcakes, cinnamon rolls, or stacked cakes in just a few minutes. It’s the perfect, pipeable cream cheese frosting that balances sweet with buttery smooth texture and just a hint of cream cheese tang. It’s a classic buttercream that you can turn to whenever you need a quick frosting.

a glass bowl of piped cream cheese frosting with powdered sugar around it

We all have those standby recipes right? Those go to, quick and easy ones that are versatile and always just work. This ridiculously easy cream cheese frosting is one of those for me.

I have a small admission…I don’t love cake. Or cupcakes. It’s just not my thing (I’m a brownie girl!) But my husband would seriously eat cake as the only dessert for the rest of his life. So I bake them quite frequently! But since I’m not a cake connoisseur so to speak, I’m also not a frosting connoisseur. So I turn to this cream cheese buttercream frosting often.

It’s creamy, sweet but not overly so, with just enough tang to keep it interesting. And bonus, it’s SO EASY and works on a lot of different things. Carrot cake, red velvet, chocolate, spice cake, or even cinnamon rolls! Basically what I’m saying is…pin it, bookmark it, keep it. It’s you’re frosting go to.

Frosting Ingredients

It doesn’t get much simpler than a cream cheese buttercream frosting. No meringues to whip, just butter, sugar, and a bit of flavor.

a bowl of powdered sugar, softened butter, softened cream cheese, vanilla extract, and a pinch of salt
  • Powdered Sugar – No exceptions, you need superfine powdered sugar to make a creamy buttercream.
  • Unsalted Butter – I like European butter when possible (better fat ratio), and unsalted is a must.
  • Cream Cheese – A softened chunk of cream cheese is fairly essential to cream cheese frosting!
  • Vanilla Extract – Ever make your own? You should try! Get the recipe.
  • Salt – Just a pinch, it enhances flavor, even sweet ones.

How to make It

Simple ingredients, simple process, easy to love! This makes enough frosting for 24 cupcakes!

butter and cream cheese creamed together with sugar then piped
  1. Begin by creaming the butter, cream cheese, vanilla, and salt together in a large bowl until smooth and fluffy.
  2. Add in one cup of powdered sugar, and beat on low until combined.
  3. Repeat until all the powdered sugar is combined in thoroughly and you have a smooth but thick cream cheese frosting.
glass bowl of piped cream cheese frosting

FAQ’s

Can I make this ahead of time?

Yes! Simple beat together and store appropriately. It’s safe at room temp for up to 8 hours, but should be refrigerated after that, for up to 3 days. If you want to prep WAY in advance, store in the freezer for a month.

The frosting is too thick to pipe from the fridge.

Let it return to room temperature, even beat it again with an electric beater to loosen it back up if need be. Don’t heat it in the microwave!

My frosting is runny, what happened?

Either your butter or cream cheese was too soft, or you haven’t added enough powdered sugar. If your butter or cream cheese is melty, it won’t whip properly. It should be soft to the touch, nothing more. If you’ve done that right, add more powdered sugar, half a cup at a time until desired thickness.

My frosting is too thick!

If you’ve added too much powdered sugar too fast, the frosting will be stiff and difficult to work with. You can rectify this by adding a tablespoon of milk or cream at a time until desired thickness.

Should I pipe or spread this?

Either one! Spread it on sheet cake or cinnamon rolls or pipe it onto cupcakes or your stacked cakes, even on cookies!

A bowl of cream cheese buttercream frosting in front of cupcakes

I hope this is the easy cream cheese frosting you’ve been looking for. It’s certainly a frosting recipe that I love, so much so that I’d even eat cake for it. 😉

Give it a go (I mean it doesn’t take long, and while you’re at it, try out these fun cake recipes to try it on. Or, eat it with a spoon, no judgment here!

a bowl of cream cheese frosting in front of cupcakes
Print

Easy Cream Cheese Frosting

A simple, but delicious pipeable cream cheese frosting that's versatile and creamy.
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 5 minutes
Servings 24
Calories 163kcal
Author Mikayla M

Ingredients

  • 6 ounces cream cheese softened
  • 6 ounces unsalted butter softened
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 4 1/2 cups powdered sugar
  • pinch salt

Instructions

  • Cream together butter, cream cheese, salt, and vanilla until smooth and fluffy.
  • Beat in powdered sugar, 1 cup at a time, until a thick, creamy frosting comes together and all the powdered sugar is dissolved.
  • Use as desired! Store at room temperature up to 8 hours, in the fridge up to 3 days or in the freezer up to 1 month.

Notes

Times and Nutritional Values are a best estimate based upon personal equipment and products. They may vary based upon the products and equipment available to you. 

Nutrition

Calories: 163kcal | Carbohydrates: 23g | Protein: 1g | Fat: 8g | Saturated Fat: 5g | Cholesterol: 23mg | Sodium: 24mg | Potassium: 11mg | Sugar: 22g | Vitamin A: 272IU | Calcium: 9mg | Iron: 1mg

The post Easy Cream Cheese Frosting appeared first on The Flour Handprint.

]]>
https://www.theflourhandprint.com/easy-cream-cheese-frosting/feed/ 0
Asiago Cream Sauce https://www.theflourhandprint.com/asiago-cream-sauce/ https://www.theflourhandprint.com/asiago-cream-sauce/#respond Fri, 28 Feb 2020 21:28:08 +0000 https://www.theflourhandprint.com/?p=9323 This page contains affiliate links. For more information please read my Disclosure Policy. Say goodbye to jarred Alfredo sauce for good with this easy, flavorful recipe for Asiago Cream Sauce. It comes together quickly on the stove and works beautifully as a drizzle for meats, veggies, or as an Asiago pasta sauce. You’ll keep a […]

The post Asiago Cream Sauce appeared first on The Flour Handprint.

]]>

This page contains affiliate links. For more information please read my Disclosure Policy.

Say goodbye to jarred Alfredo sauce for good with this easy, flavorful recipe for Asiago Cream Sauce. It comes together quickly on the stove and works beautifully as a drizzle for meats, veggies, or as an Asiago pasta sauce. You’ll keep a wedge of Asiago cheese on standby for this recipe!

a glass carafe of white cheese sauce in front of a bowl of pasta

While I’m definitely not against the roux/milk/slow stirred in cheese type of sauces, I’m pretty much in love with this quick and easy Asiago cream sauce. There’s something soul satisfying about a luscious cheesy sauce, and I’m not biased against pouring it on more than pasta!

WHat is asiago?

I’m sure you’ve seen the wedges of aged Asiago cheese among the selection of Parmesan and Romano’s at the grocery store. If you haven’t, take a close look, it’s there! Asiago is a cows milk cheese originally produced in the northeast area of Italy that thankfully, we can get here in the states as well.

Authentic Asiago cheese can come in a variety of textures based on the length of it’s aging. Fresh Asiago is sweet, soft…and basically impossible to find here. But aged, crumbly Asiago is usually available at most grocery stores. While not nearly as popular as it’s Parmesan and Romano cousins you can usually find one or two brands available. It’s nutty, salty, and downright delicious.

Ingredients for ASiago Cheese Sauce

The fact that this cream sauce only has 6 ingredients, two of which are salt and pepper, definitely goes in the ‘pro’ column. It seriously doesn’t get much easier, and I’m willing to bet you can whip this together most nights without any additional trips to the store.

a jar of milk, wedge of asiago cheese, a bowl of oil, chopped parsley, and spices on a metal baking sheet
  • Asiago Cheese – You can’t make Asiago sauce without it! 1 wedge will do, =you’ll need 4 ounces for this recipe.
  • Heavy Cream – You’ll need 3 cups of heavy cream.
  • Fresh Garlic – Usually about 3 cloves, or whatever equals 1 tablespoon of minced garlic.
  • Oil – Olive oil is my preference, just a tablespoon or so.
  • Salt & Pepper – This is largely to taste, I usually use between 1/2 to 1 tsp of each.
  • Parsley (Optional) – I just think fresh chopped parsley goes so nicely with a creamy cheese sauce, especially over pasta. If you have it, I recommend it!

TIP: This recipe yields enough Asiago cheese sauce for one pound of pasta.

How to Make Asiago Cream Sauce

The entire process for this recipe takes 20 minutes max, start to finish. You can easily boil pasta, sear some chicken, or roast veggies in that time, sounds like dinner is on the table, doesn’t it?

a pot with sauteed garlic over an image of the same pot full of creamy asiago sauce
  1. Heat a medium saucepan over medium heat. Meanwhile, mince your garlic, shred your cheese, and measure out your cream. I recommend mincing the garlic with 1/2 tsp of salt so it makes a salty garlic paste, it draws out the garlic flavor, and seasons the sauce.
  2. When pan is hot, add the oil and the minced garlic, saute until fragrant, about 30 seconds to 1 minute, stirring constantly.
  3. Pour in the heavy cream and stir to combine. Heat, stirring occasionally, until the cream is steaming but not boiling, about 5 minutes. Add in cheese while stirring until melted in.
  4. Continue stirring every couple of minutes until thickened. It coat the back of the spoon thickly, another 5 minutes or so.
  5. Season with salt and pepper to taste, and serve as desired!
a bowl of pasta with asiago sauce being poured over top

FAQ’s

Can I make this ahead of time?

This sauce really is best served warm and fresh. You can make it ahead of time and store for up to a two days in the fridge, but you’ll need to reheat it gently, frequently stirring to return it to it’s smooth state.

Can I freeze this?

No, it will separate and break when thawed.

Can I use other cheeses?

Sure! Go ahead and use Parmesan or Romano for similar, but delicious variations.

A fork with creamy sauced noodles on it over a bowl of pasta

Now to eat!

So you might be able to tell from the pictures that I’m a bit biased toward using this as an Asiago pasta sauce, but you really can use this however you like! I have big plans with crusted pork chops, and I’ve already drizzled it over roasted asparagus, crispy chicken thighs, and a pan seared steak with lovely results. Experiment, go crazy, eat it with a spoon!

You may also enjoy These other easy recipes…

a glass carafe of white cheese sauce in front of a bowl of pasta
Print

Asiago Cream Sauce

A quick and easy luscious cream based cheese sauce made with nutty aged Asiago cheese.
Course Condiment
Cuisine American
Keyword Asiago cheese, pasta sauce, sauces
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 12 minutes
Total Time 17 minutes
Servings 4
Calories 733kcal
Author Mikayla M

Ingredients

  • 4 ounces Asiago Cheese, shredded about 1 1/2 cups
  • 24 ounces Heavy Cream 3 cups
  • 1 Tbs olive oil
  • 1 Tbs garlic, minced about 3 cloves
  • 1 tsp salt to taste
  • 1/2 tsp pepper to taste

Instructions

  • Heat a medium saucepan over medium heat. Meanwhile shred the cheese, measure out cream, and mince the garlic with 1/2 tsp of salt (chop together).
  • Add oil to the hot pan, then add the garlic and salt mixture. Saute, stirring constantly until the garlic is fragrant, about 30 seconds to 1 minute.
  • Pour in the cream and stir to combine with garlic. Heat until cream mixture is steaming, but not boiling, stirring occasionally, about 5 minutes.
  • When cream is steaming, begin adding the cheese in half cup increments, stirring until you've melted it all in.
  • Continue to heat, stirring occasionally until sauce has thickened enough to coat and cling to the back of a spoon. About another 5 minutes.
  • Taste and season with pepper and salt to taste, then serve immediately!

Notes

I highly recommend chopped parsley on top of the sauce!

Nutrition

Calories: 733kcal | Carbohydrates: 6g | Protein: 14g | Fat: 74g | Saturated Fat: 44g | Cholesterol: 252mg | Sodium: 1101mg | Potassium: 154mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 1g | Vitamin A: 2722IU | Vitamin C: 2mg | Calcium: 450mg | Iron: 1mg

The post Asiago Cream Sauce appeared first on The Flour Handprint.

]]>
https://www.theflourhandprint.com/asiago-cream-sauce/feed/ 0